Category Archives: Hobbes

The Hobbesian State of Nature in ‘Lord of the Flies’

Hobbes thought that without “common power, there is no law, where no law, no justice” (pg. 85), and ‘Piggy’ echo’s these sentiments in his plea for a civilised environment in the clip. According to Hobbes, only in this refined state, with laws that specifically deter survivalist drives, can human prosperity and security be possible.

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The Hobbesian State of Nature in ‘Lord of the Flies’

Hobbes thought that without “common power, there is no law, where no law, no justice” (pg. 85), and ‘Piggy’ echo’s these sentiments in his plea for a civilised environment in the clip. According to Hobbes, only in this refined state, with laws that specifically deter survivalist drives, can human prosperity and security be possible.

Hobbesian roots in the Tragedy of the Commons

In The Leviathan, Hobbes suggests that without a social contract to which individuals are bound, society will take on a ‘natural state of all against all’. Reflecting Hobbes’ theory, the parable ‘the tragedy of the commons’ outlines the scenario of several farmers having open access to a field in which they can graze livestock.

Hobbesian roots in the Tragedy of the Commons

In The Leviathan, Hobbes suggests that without a social contract to which individuals are bound, society will take on a ‘natural state of all against all’. Reflecting Hobbes’ theory, the parable ‘the tragedy of the commons’ outlines the scenario of several farmers having open access to a field in which they can graze livestock.

V for Vendetta and Hobbes

In his revolutionary speech, V remarks that the citizens of Britain surrendered their freedom due to fear. After a period of war, terror, and disease, citizens were granted order and peace, for the price of “silent, obedient consent.” V’s speech reminds us of Hobbes’ Leviathan.

V for Vendetta and Hobbes

In his revolutionary speech, V remarks that the citizens of Britain surrendered their freedom due to fear. After a period of war, terror, and disease, citizens were granted order and peace, for the price of “silent, obedient consent.” V’s speech reminds us of Hobbes’ Leviathan.

Ayn Rand as a Hobbesian

Ayn Rand's ideas about objectivism, rational morality, and individual interest parallel what Hobbes put forth in the Leviathan. Like Hobbes, Rand rejects any faith-based morality and suggests that people must pursue their own interests, and take the inherent value of their own lives and happiness as their moral compass.

Ayn Rand as a Hobbesian

Ayn Rand's ideas about objectivism, rational morality, and individual interest parallel what Hobbes put forth in the Leviathan. Like Hobbes, Rand rejects any faith-based morality and suggests that people must pursue their own interests, and take the inherent value of their own lives and happiness as their moral compass.